Buying Your First Car

7 Steps to Buying Your First Car

  1. Figure out what you can afford

  2. Shop around for the best deal

  3. Test drive different cars

  4. Get a car history report and mechanical inspection

  5. Finalize the purchase and register the car

  6. Insure your car

  7. Enjoy your new ride!

 

Stick To Your Budget

First time car buyers often make the mistake of rushing into a purchase without doing their research first. This can lead to overpaying for a car that doesn’t fit their needs or budget.

By setting a budget first, you can avoid this common pitfall. Figure out how much you can comfortably afford to spend on a car payment each month. Then, research the Fair Market Range prices for the type of car you’re interested in. This will give you a good starting point

Start Your Research

With an established budget in hand, it’s time to start shopping around for the best deal. There are so many sites online to do research where you can check out safety ratings, available options, interior features and more.

Test Drive Several Cars

After you’ve narrowed down your choices, it’s time to take them for a spin. This will help you get a feel for how the car drives and handles. It’s also a good time to see if there are any additional features that you may want or need.

Get A Car History Report And Mechanical Inspection

Once you’ve found the perfect car, it’s time to do a little digging into its history. A car history report will tell you if the car has been in any accidents or had any major repair work done.

Finalize The Purchase and Register The Car

After you’ve negotiated the price of the car, it’s time to finalize the purchase. This usually involves signing a sales contract and putting down a deposit. The great news is that the dealership will typically handle all the paperwork involved in registering the car.

Insure Your Car

Now that you’re the proud owner of a new car, it’s time to get it insured. The type and amount of coverage you need will vary depending on your state’s laws and your personal driving habits.

Enjoy your new ride!

Buying your first car is a big decision, but we’re here to help make it as easy as possible. We want you to be happy with your purchase and our team will be with you every step of the way.

Contact us today to get started.

 

 

Is Your Car Pulling You In The Wrong Direction

Wheel Alignment - Avoiding The Danger Signs Ahead

If you're experiencing problems with your car pulling to one side, it may be due to a misaligned wheel. A wheel alignment can correct this problem and ensure that your car drives in a straight line. Avoid the danger of driving with a misaligned wheel by getting it corrected at a reputable automotive shop.

Most people don't think about their vehicle's alignment until they experience unusual tire wear or handling concerns. However, just like any other component of your car, regular upkeep is critical to maintaining it in good working order. Here are four reasons why routine wheel alignments are essential.

Wheel Alignments Prevent Uneven Tire Wear

The number one reason to keep up with your wheel alignments is to prevent uneven tire wear. When your wheels are out of alignment, they put unnecessary stress on your tires. This can cause them to wear down faster on one side than the other. It also reduces the life of your tires and makes them more likely to fail unexpectedly.

Wheel Alignments Improve Handling

Another important reason to get regular wheel alignments is to improve the handling of your vehicle. When your wheels are out of alignment, it can make your car feel unstable on the road. This can be dangerous, especially when driving at high speeds or in adverse weather conditions.

Wheel Alignments Improve Fuel Efficiency

When your wheels are out of alignment, your car has to work harder to move forward. This extra effort means that your car will burn through fuel more quickly. In addition, drag from misaligned wheels can also cause your car to lose speed, which wastes even more fuel.

Wheel Alignments Extend the Life of Your Suspension

When your wheels are out of alignment, they place extra stress on your suspension components. Over time, this extra stress can cause these parts to wear out prematurely, resulting in a need for costly repairs or even replacement.

Regular wheel alignments are an important part of keeping your car running safely and efficiently. If you've noticed any unusual tire wear or handling problems, be sure to schedule an appointment with a qualified mechanic right away.

 

Don't Get Burned - Beat The Summer Heat

5 Tips To Keep Your Parked Car Cooler

Summertime is approaching fast, and with it, soaring temperatures. The last thing you want to do is climb into a scorching car and wait for it to cool down.

Did you know "When temperatures outside climb range from 80 degrees to 100 degrees, the internal temperature of your car can reach a scorching 130 to 172" (actionnews)

What Can You Do To Lower The Temperature In Your Car?

• Tip 1: Park in the Shade

If you have the option to park in the shade, take it! In many parking lots they will have trees or other natural shade options, Also try to park so that the sun is not shining on the driver's side. Even a few minutes in the shade can make a big difference.

• Tip 2: Use Your Visor And A Sunshade

You can find a sunshade for your windshield at most auto stores. Sunshades are especially useful if you have to park in the direct sun. They will help keep your car cooler and make it more comfortable to get in. Your windshield visor can also help keep the sun from entering your car

You could also fit a visor to your rear window as well as invest in window vent visors to keep individual passenger windows shaded.

Tip 3: Let Your Car Cool Before Getting In

Does your car have a remote starter? You turn on the air conditioning to full blast, shut all the doors and give your car a few minutes to cool down before driving. The other option is Leave the doors open for a minute to let most of the hot air out before getting in.

Tip 3: Cover Up Steering Wheel

No one wants to try to dive with a hot steering wheel. Consider placing a light-colored terry cloth towel over the steering wheel before you leave the car. This may reduce how much heat it absorbs

Tip 4: Cover Your Seats

This will protect your seats from the sun's rays and reduce how much heat they absorb. If you have leather seats, this is especially important as they can get uncomfortably hot in direct sunlight. You can buy special seat covers designed to reflect the sun's rays, or just use a light-colored towel or blanket

Tip 5: Tint You Windows

One of the best ways to keep your car cool is to tint your windows. This will reduce the amount of heat that comes into the car, making it more comfortable when you get in.

While you may or may not be able to do all of these things, any combination will help make your car more comfortable in the summer heat. Enjoy your summer and stay cool!

What's That Noise - Your Safety Depends On It

Your Brakes Are Telling You Something!

Brakes are an essential part of every car, helping you to slow down and stop when needed. Generally, if your brakes are making a high-pitched squealing noise when you first step on them, it's an indication that the brake pads need to be replaced.

What causes that noise when you brake?

This can be due to a number of different factors - worn or dirty brake pads, issues with the rotors or calipers, or even something as simple as dirt or debris caught in the brakes.

If you're noticing a strange noise coming from your brakes, it's always best to have them checked out by a professional mechanic to ensure there isn't a bigger issue at play.

What are the different types of brakes, and how do they work?

There are many different types of brakes, each designed to perform a specific function and work in a particular way. Some common brake types include disc brakes, drum brakes, and vacuum brakes.

Disc brakes use a system of pads that press against a spinning metal disc to slow or stop the vehicle. Drum brakes consist of two brake shoes that press against the inside of a stationary metal drum. Vacuum brakes use suction to slow or stop a vehicle, drawing air from the atmosphere into chambers

How can you tell if your brakes need to be serviced or replaced?

If your car is making a noise when you brake, there's a good chance that something is wrong with your brakes. There are several things you can do to check your brakes and see if they need to be serviced or replaced.

Another way to tell if your brakes are in need of service is to look at your brake fluid levels. If the fluid is low or dark, it could be a sign that your brakes need to be flushed and refilled.

What does turning the Rotors mean?

If you've ever had your car's brakes serviced, you may have heard the term "turning the rotors." But what does that actually mean?

Rotors are the metal discs that your brake pads press against to slow or stop your car. When they become worn or dirty, they can cause a number of problems with braking performance. Turning the rotors means machining them down so that they are smooth and clean again, allowing for better braking. If they get worn down below a certain point, they will need to be replaced entirely by a mechanic.

 

As a driver, it's important to be aware of any issues with your car's brakes, as this can have serious implications for your safety on the road. Some common symptoms of worn or faulty brakes include a high-pitched squealing noise when braking, low or dark brake fluid levels, vibrations or shuddering when applying the brakes, and poor response time. If you notice any of these issues, be sure to have your brakes checked by a professional mechanic as soon as possible.

Can Your Car Wax Help Keep The Value Of Your Car

To Wax Or Not To Wax?

It's no secret that keeping your car looking good can help to maintain its value. But what many people don't know is that there are a lot of things you can do to keep your car looking great - and some of them are easy and inexpensive! One example is car waxing.

1. The benefits of car waxing

Waxing your car is one of the best ways to protect its finish and keep it looking new. It creates a barrier between your car’s paint and the elements, which can cause fading, scratching, and other damage. Waxing also makes it easier to clean your car, since the wax forms a protective layer that dirt and dust can

2. The costs of car waxing

The costs of car waxing vary depending on the type of wax and the amount you need. However, it is generally a very affordable way to protect your car’s finish.

3. How to wax your car properly

If you're looking to get the most out of your car wax, follow these steps:

  • Make sure your car is clean. The wax will adhere better to a clean surface, and it will be easier to remove any residual wax when you're finished.

  • Apply the wax in a thin layer. Too much wax can actually end up doing more harm than good, since it can obscure your car's paint job and make it difficult to polish later on.

  • Work in small sections. It's best to apply the wax using a circular motion, and don't forget the edges!

  • Buff off the wax with a soft cloth. Be sure to remove

4. What are the types of waxes available?

There are a few different types of car waxes on the market, each with its own set of benefits and drawbacks:

  • Spray-On Waxes: These waxes are easy to apply and usually don’t require any buffing. However, they don’t offer as much protection as other types of waxes and can be prone to fading.

  • Paste Waxes: More durable than spray-on waxes, and they usually provide better protection against scratches and fading. However, they can be difficult to apply and require a lot of elbow grease.

  • Liquid Waxes: Liquid waxes are the most popular type of car wax. They’re easy to apply, and most come with a buffing cloth.

  • Carnauba Wax: Carnauba wax is the most durable type of car wax and offers the best protection against scratches and fading. It’s also the most expensive type of wax.

  • Ceramic Wax: A newer type of car wax that’s said to offer even better protection than Carnauba wax. However, it’s also more expensive.

4. How to care for your car's finish without using any products at all

  • If you're not interested in using car wax, there are a few other things you can do to protect your car's finish and keep it looking new:

  • Park in the shade. The sun can cause your car's paint to fade over time.

  • Wash your car regularly. Dirt and dust can scratch your car's paintjob

If you're still unsure about whether or not car waxing is worth the investment, it might be helpful to consult a professional. They can help determine if waxing your car will be an effective way to keep its value and maintain its shine over time.

 

 

Front Wheel Drive VS. AWD What is the Difference

What is the difference between front wheel drive and all wheel drive?

When you are looking for a new car, one of the decisions you have to make is whether to get a front wheel drive (FWD) or all wheel drive (AWD) vehicle. Both options have their pros and cons, so which one should you choose? Here is a look at the pros and cons of each option:

How Do Front Wheel Drives Cars Work

Front wheel drive cars are powered by the front wheels, while the back wheels simply rotate and provide traction. This is different from rear wheel drive cars, which are powered by the back wheels. Front wheel drive cars are more stable and easier to control than rear wheel drive cars, making them a popular choice for many drivers.

Another way to explain it would be to say that a front wheel drive vehicle transfers power from the engine to the front wheels, while a rear wheel drive vehicle transfers power from the engine to the back wheels.

What are the pros of front wheel drive vehicles

  • Front wheel drive vehicles are better for fuel economy because only the front wheels are used to power the car. This means that less power is needed, and you will save on gas money.

  • Rear wheel drive vehicles are better for getting through tough terrain and handling curves. The weight of the engine is at the back of the car, which gives it more stability when driving on winding roads or in slippery conditions.

What are the cons of front wheel drive vehicles

Front wheel drive vehicles can sometimes be less stable than all wheel drive vehicles, especially when cornering or braking. This is because the weight of the engine is pushing down on the front wheels, which can cause them to lose traction. Additionally, front wheel drive vehicles can be more difficult to control in icy or snowy conditions.

How does all wheel drive work?

All wheel drive is a system that sends power to all four wheels of a vehicle. This can help improve traction and handling in slippery or challenging conditions. AWD systems vary in complexity, with some relying on sensors to detect when the car needs more traction and distributing power accordingly. Others use a center differential to split the power between the front and rear wheels.

Regardless of the system in use, all wheel drive can provide a safer and more sure-footed driving experience. If you're looking for a car that can handle any condition, consider an all wheel drive model.

What are the pros of all wheel drive vehicles

All wheel drive vehicles are better in slippery conditions because all four wheels are used to power the car. This gives you more traction and prevents you from slipping and sliding. If you live in an area that gets a lot of snow, an AWD car is a better option. They also provide more stability and control than FWD cars when driving on slick surfaces.

What are the con's of an all wheel drive car?

All wheel drive cars can be more expensive than front wheel drive cars. They also require more maintenance, as all of the components need to be working properly in order to distribute power evenly. AWD cars can also be less fuel-efficient than FWD cars, and they take up more space on the road.

So Which Type Of Car Car Should I Get?

That’s a question that can only be answered by you. Consider the pros and cons of both front wheel drive and all wheel drive vehicles to see which option would be best for your needs. If you live in an area with lots of icy or snowy conditions, an all wheel drive vehicle might be a better option. But if you live in a warmer climate and don’t need the extra traction, a front wheel drive vehicle could be a better choice. Ultimately, the decision is up to you!

Top Car Care Tips

We've all heard stories of cars and trucks lasting anywhere from 200,000 to even 500,000 miles.

But how? Three simple words: maintenance, maintenance, maintenance. Here are some of the top maintenance tips to help make the engine, transmission and other parts of your vehicle last even longer. 

1. Check the oil: The easiest task you can do to increase the longevity of your vehicle is to keep the proper amount of oil in the engine. Also, change the oil and filter as recommended in the manufacturers owner’s manual, or every 3000 miles to be safe.

2. Check power steering fluid: Most older vehicles and even some new models have a hydraulic power steering pump that requires power steering fluid. These pumps have a screw-type cap that lifts off, so the fluid level can easily be checked.

3. Transmission fluid replacement: Having the correct amount of transmission fluid is important because it cools the transmission, lubricates its moving parts, and makes shifting gears smoother. But of course this fluid deteriorates over time. Frequent stop-and-go driving or anything that puts stress on the transmission, such as towing a trailer, accelerates this deterioration. Under these type of conditions the transmission’s operating temperature rises, which puts a strain on the components and the fluid. Automakers recommend you change the fluid more under those conditions. Of course you can check the owner’s manual for more details.

4. Radiator coolant flushing: Coolant has rust inhibitors that break down over time. Rust and corrosion can harm the engine, plug up a thermostat, and damage the water pump. Some automakers recommend changing the coolant every 30,000 miles, while some suggest 100,000 miles. Check your owner’s manual to be sure.

5. Top off brake fluid: While you are checking all of your other fluids, it’s a good idea to check the brake fluid level as well. Put your vehicle on a level surface, then remove the reservoir cap. Make sure the brake fluid level is between the minimum and maximum marks on the fluid reservoir. Use the recommended fluid (DOT3, DOT4, etc.) and fill to the proper level.

6. Rotate your tires: Tires aren't cheap, so you want to make them last. Almost all tires should be rotated every 5000 to 6000 miles and alignment checked every 10,000 to 15,000. Also, it is very important to maintain the proper air pressure in each tire. A sticker on the driver’s door frame lists the proper tire pressures for the front and rear tires.

7. Have a clean engine air filter: A clean air filer can help increase your miles per gallon, help engine performance, and contribute to lower engine emissions.

No maintenance required

There are some components on cars that at one time required regular maintenance, but because of technological advances, there’s no need anymore. Ball joints and steering linkage which at one time required lubrication, no longer require it; new spark plugs may last 150,000 miles and at one time vehicle batteries (which are now sealed for lift) needed the water level in the electrolyte periodically checked.

Why you should get your car detailed

3 Reasons Why you Should Spend $100 Or More To Get Your Car Detailed

Detailing

It sounds so, you know, involved. Can't you just wash your car in the driveway as have countless generations before, or simply run it through a car wash once a month? Sure, that would all be fine. You should wash your car about every month and wax it a few times per year, to keep the exterior finish in good shape. But the daily grind still takes its toll — more so if you have pets, children, or use your vehicle for gardening/home-improvement duty or lead an active, outdoorsy lifestyle. You don't even want to know what three kids did to my Honda Odyssey minivan on a regular basis. My argument is that it's worth it, once a year, to spend $100 to have your car detailed, and maybe more if you want a heavy-duty detail. That just means in addition to a thorough exterior wash-and-wax, a professional detailer or full-service car wash will get down and dirty with the interior, extracting as much filth as possible. You'll be shocked at how new your old car looks. And in some cases, a mobile detailer will come to you, so you don't have to leave home! I've chosen the $100 figure because that's a decent ballpark for proper detailing. You can spend extra for ever-more surgical obsessiveness, involving compressed air, Q-Tips, X-Acto knives, whatever it takes. The price just goes up.But you also don't have to spend that much for less thorough quasi-detailing. This option will consume far less time. I recently paid about $30 to have my Toyota Prius washed, waxed, and more heavily cleaned inside than usual. The entire process ate up about half an hour on a weekend. I ended up with a quite tidy hybrid. Ultimately, there are three main reasons to undertake this yearly or bi-annual ritual (if you opt for the cheaper treatment, which could also be a quarterly thing).

 

1. Your vehicle isn't gross and is, therefore, a more pleasant place to spend time.

You don't have to be a neat freak to be depressed if your car slips over the edge into a Superfund site. Months of spilled coffee, scattered Doritos, and the simple churn of stuff will do it.

 

2. It maintains the resale value.

A sharp interior helps you get top dollar for a trade-in or private sale, no doubt about it. And in an era when everybody shops based on internet photos, the cleaner the better.

 

3. You support your friendly neighborhood car wash.

I can get a basic wash in my neighborhood for less than $10. And I do. But every so often, it's a good idea to accept the upsells so that your local business can make more money and, you know, stay in business.

Car Wash

https://www.businessinsider.com/why-you-should-spend-money-to-get-your-car-detailed-2018-8

Here Are All the Best Used Cars You Can Buy

Here Are All the Best Used Cars You Can Buy in 2021, by Category
Based on reliability, resale, and safety, iseecars.com breaks down the best buys for every segment. Not surprisingly, there are a lot of Hondas and Toyotas here.

Right now is a great time to sell a used car, not a great to buy one. That’s because chip shortages, COVID plant closings, and the resulting pent-up buyer demand have all combined to see used car prices and availability skyrocket.
“In a four-week period that we just ended two weeks ago… the new car inventory, on average, across all types of models and all dealers, dropped 16.6%,” said iseecars.com executive analyst Karl Brauer. “So in one month, we lost almost 17% of the new car inventory. If it did that three more months there would basically be no new cars on dealership lots at all.” 

Which has a direct effect on the used car market:. “As new cars go, so go used cars,” said Brauer. “When there aren’t any new cars to buy, because of chip shortages, people don’t go buy new cars, they keep their old car, which means there aren’t any used cars to buy because you don’t get used cars till people give them up for a new car.”

So if you are in the market to buy a used car right now, it makes even more sense now to research a little and make sure you get a good one. And how do you determine that? The people at iseecars.com sift through almost 12 million used-car trade-ins and cars returned at the ends of leases to see which ones are the best among the millions of cars that trade hands in a given year. “The winners are cars that have demonstrated long-term reliability, hold their value the best, and have the highest average safety ratings from the National Highway Transit Safety Administration (NHTSA),” the company said.
https://www.autoweek.com/news/industry-news/a36455247/best-used-cars-by-category/

Make Your Car Last 200,000 Miles


Buy a Safe, Reliable Model
You can coax any vehicle to 200,000 miles with enough patience and cash, but that doesn’t make doing so a good idea for everyone. The best way to minimize visits to the shop is to start with a model that has a reliable track record. And you don’t have to look far for a source. Consumer Reports compiles comprehensive reliability information from our Annual Auto Survey of members. They provide us with data on more than 1 million vehicles, and we publish the findings. In addition to choosing a reliable model, make sure to pick a car you’ll want to keep for a long time. Don’t compromise on the features you want or buy less or more vehicle than you think you’ll need. If this is going to be a long relationship, it may as well be a happy one. So choose a vehicle that will fit your lifestyle today and tomorrow, and pick one that you’ll enjoy driving. While you’re shopping, keep a sharp eye out for cars that have the latest safety features. Automatic emergency braking, forward collision warning, and blind spot warning are highly recommended. (If you're buying an older car, insist on electronic stability control and a rear camera, features that are standard on all new cars.) Remember to research how well any vehicle you’re interested in performed in government and insurance-industry safety tests.
If you’re buying a used car, be on the lookout for signs of neglect or abuse. Check for dents, rust, and mismatched body panels. Look for paint overspray, which is often a sign of repair work. Make sure all interior components are in good condition. A mildew smell, discolored carpeting, and silt in the trunk are indicators of water damage. All components under the hood should be free of corrosion and grease. Check the fluids and watch out for damp areas in the engine compartment and under the vehicle, which might point to leaks.
When you’ve found a vehicle you’re interested in, take it to an independent mechanic for a diagnostic inspection, which costs about $100 to $150. A mechanic can help you spot signs of wear or abuse that you might not see.

Stick to the Schedule
Follow the maintenance schedule in your car’s owner’s manual. It spells out when to take care of every service for the life of your car, including routine oil and filter changes, tire rotations, and more major service such as timing-belt replacement. Simply follow the routine spelled out for you. Even missing one oil change can contribute to premature engine wear, or cause damage and reduce the chances of your car remaining reliable for long. (Go to our guide to car maintenance.)
If you’ve neglected following your vehicle’s maintenance schedule, it’s not too late to get with the program. Have a mechanic inspect your vehicle and take care of any apparent problems, no matter how minor. Then introduce yourself to your owner’s manual and start fresh. Even if your vehicle doesn’t make it to 200,000 miles, it will definitely last longer with proper ongoing care.
Following the maintenance schedule has become easier over the years because longer-lasting components and fluids have increased service intervals. Today, many cars can go 10,000 miles between oil changes, and some spark plugs don’t need replacing for 100,000 miles.
Consider using what's often called the severe-use or extreme-use maintenance schedule in your owner’s manual. Most drivers who need to follow such a schedule do a lot of city driving; live in a very hot or cold climate in mountain regions or near the ocean; make a lot of short trips; tow a trailer; or drive in dusty conditions. If that description sounds like it includes a lot of drivers, it does.
The difference between the regular maintenance schedule and the severe-use schedule can be significant, with severe-use oil-change intervals being much shorter, sometimes twice as often. Intervals for other services also change accordingly under severe-use guidelines.
Many new models from a wide variety of carmakers make it even easier to stay on top of maintenance, with sensors that take into account your mileage and driving habits to determine the optimum time for maintenance. They monitor the miles driven since the last service and record data such as how much stop-and-go driving is done, the engine temperature during each trip, and the time the engine spends operating at higher speeds. The system then calculates how quickly your oil is breaking down and alerts you when service is due, and can even adjust a car’s complete service interval to compensate for your specific use.
But don’t overmaintain your car; that can be a waste of money. Watch out for dealers or repair shops that add maintenance work not called for in the owner’s manual. That can add hundreds of dollars to a routine service bill.

Don't Skimp on Parts
Trying to save a couple of bucks on cheap parts and fluids could cost you in the long run. The wrong type of oil or transmission fluid, for example, could cause damage leading to expensive repairs, voiding your warranty and diminishing long-term reliability. Cheap and no-name belts and hoses might not wear as well as those from a name-brand supplier. To be safe, only use parts and fluids meeting manufacturer specifications.
If your car’s manual says that premium fuel is required, go for the expensive stuff. Some engines won’t perform correctly without higher-octane gasoline, and using regular or even midgrade fuel might cause damage. If premium fuel is recommended (but not required), you’re fine using lower-octane gasoline because the engine-control system has sensors that will compensate for it. Using premium fuel in a car designed to run on regular gas won’t cause an improvement in performance, fuel economy, or engine life, so save your money. (For more tips, see our guide to fuel economy.)
Know What to Watch For
Even if you adhere to the schedule, remember that problems can arise unexpectedly. The manual might say how often to inspect belts and hoses, for example, but when to replace them can vary greatly by climate and other factors. So get in the habit of opening the hood to look, listen, and smell for anything unusual. Fraying and cracks in belts are sure signs of trouble, along with cracks and bulges in hoses. Look for evidence of leaks, and check the level and condition of coolant and brake and power-steering fluids. They can give you clues about what’s going on inside components. Gritty-­feeling or burnt-smelling transmission fluid, for example, could indicate the start of internal damage. By catching it early, you could reduce repair costs and increase long-term reliability.
On the road, listen for odd noises from your engine, suspension, and brakes. If you have any doubts about a noise, get it checked out right away by a mechanic. Taking care of a minor repair now could help you avoid an expensive one later.
Consider investing in a vehicle service manual, available at car dealerships and most auto-parts stores. More detailed than your owner’s manual, a service manual can explain in illustrated detail what to look for, and assist with minor repairs that can extend long-term reliability. (Learn more from our car repair guide and estimator.)


Keep Your Machine Clean
Cleaning inside and out will keep your car looking fresh, and the routine will also make it a more pleasant place to be as the miles roll up. Washing and waxing can help preserve the paint and prevent rust, and vacuuming sand and dirt out of carpets and seats can minimize premature wear that leads to tears and holes. And while you clean, you might spot small problems that you wouldn’t notice otherwise, such as scratches that need to be painted over and loose or broken parts that should be repaired or replaced. (Learn how to make it shine with our car wax advice.)


The End of the Road
No matter how well you choose and care for a car, someday it will be time to move on because it’s costing too much or is no longer safe. Still, saying goodbye can be a tough decision, especially if you’re attached to your car.
Here are signs that it’s probably time to find another vehicle:
  • It needs a big repair that will cost more to fix than the car is worth.
  • Rust is compromising the structural integrity.
  • It remains unreliable even with frequent repairs.
  • It has been in a flood or a serious accident.



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